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Dogs + Treatment

  • New medical advancements are extraordinary, yet many veterinarians are turning to a form of ancient medicine to help their patients. Utilizing centuries-old techniques of acupuncture and acupressure may enhance traditional veterinary medicine and further benefit the canine community.

  • Topical ear medications are necessary for the treatment of most ear conditions in dogs. This article provides step-by-step instructions on how to apply ear medications along with precautions. Tips are also given to reduce your dog’s anxiety with ear treatment.

  • The proper administration of eye medications is essential for your pet's prompt recovery. Make sure you carefully read the label and understand the prescription instructions. If you have any questions, contact your veterinarian for clarification.

  • Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive therapy that is used to examine, diagnose, and treat diseases and conditions that affect joints. It requires a specialized piece of equipment called an arthroscope which will allow your veterinarian to look inside the joint using a small fiber optic camera that is hooked up to a monitor. It often requires general anesthesia; however, small incisions in the joint allow for a quicker recovery than traditional methods allow. The recovery time will depend on the extent of the injury, but compared to traditional surgery, recovery time is generally much shorter.

  • Bandages or splints may be necessary at times if your dog has a wound or a broken bone. Bandages can be applied to the head, neck, chest, tail, or lower legs of a dog. Splints are usually applied below the knee on the back leg or below the midpoint of the humerus on the front leg. Home care is very important and you will need to monitor for changes closely. Your veterinarian will give you more specific directions for the length of time that your dog has to be bandaged.

  • Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are naturally occurring substances that are used to treat diseases or infections by affecting the immune system and how it works. They are mostly used to treat some cancers, immune-mediated diseases, or infections. Most BRMs are administered in the hospital under veterinary supervision. Side effects vary but may include fever, stomach upset, tiredness, or allergic reactions.

  • Pet owners may not realize that caffeine can be harmful to their pets. They also may not know that many foods and drinks in their cupboards contain caffeine. This particular chemical can be toxic for both cats and dogs.

  • Wounds can be simple or complicated and prompt veterinary attention is important to improve a successful outcome. Care must be used to not use topical treatments unless directed by your veterinarian as these may inadvertently delay healing. Pain medication and good home care can help aid in healing.

  • Post-operative incisions in your dog may or may not have visible stitches. It is very important to follow the instructions to ensure appropriate healing. If your dog chews or licks excessively at the incision, there is a danger of the stitches being pulled out or of infection being introduced into the wound and you may need to use an Elizabethan collar to prevent this behavior. Do not hesitate to contact your veterinarian with any questions or concerns.

  • Corneal dystrophy is a term used to describe several conditions that occur in dogs and cause the corneas to become opaque. There are three major categories of corneal dystrophy: epithelial, stromal, and endothelial. Each is named by the anatomic location of the abnormal tissue and opacity.